What benefits are offered to candidates for the Homes for Ukraine Scheme, Ukraine Family Scheme, Ukraine Extension Scheme, and Asylum in the UK?

The UK has a welfare system which is designed to help those who face financial hardship, or who have specific needs. All those from Ukraine coming to the country under the scheme will be able to seek and take up employment.

Those who are allowed to stay in the UK as part of the Homes for Ukraine schemeUkraine Family Scheme and the Ukraine Extension Scheme will have three years’ permission to stay in the UK, with the right to work and study, and they will have immediate access to benefits.

Successful applicants would be apple to get free healthcare from the National Health Service (NHS) and their children can go to free state schools.

Your local Jobcentre Plus can help you find out what benefits you can get.

This may include:

  • Universal Credit – a payment for those of working age, to help with your living costs if you’re on a low income. You could be working (including self-employed or part time) or be out of work;
  • Housing Benefit – is a scheme to help people pay their rent to housing associations or a private landlord;
  • Pension Credit – extra money to help with your living costs if you’re over State Pension age which is 66 in the UK and on a low income;
  • Disability benefits – extra money to help with additional costs for those who have a long term physical or mental health condition or disability;
  • Carer’s Allowance – extra money if you care for someone at least 35 hours a week;
  • Child Benefit – extra money to help with the cost of raising a child.

Where someone wishes to rent privately, or when the sponsorship ends, guests will have access to public funds and will be able to rent a property like anyone else. If they need to, they’ll be able to claim the housing part of Universal Credit or Housing Benefit. 

DWP staff are also delivering additional face-to-face assistance to those who need it – including tailored support to find work and advice on benefit eligibility.

Asylum in the UK

Once you have made a claim for asylum, you may require help with housing and financial support while you wait for a decision to be made.

Instead of claiming general UK benefits, such as universal credit, child benefit and housing benefits, you may be eligible for asylum support.

This also means your children will go to a free state school and you may get free healthcare from the National Health Service (NHS).

Generally, asylum seekers will not be permitted to work in the UK while their application for asylum is processed, unless you were already working in the UK under some other form of permission, for instance, a temporary work visa. Once that permission runs out, you will not be permitted to work in the UK.

The only other exception is where your application for asylum has been outstanding for more than 12 months. In this instance, it may be possible to request permission to work.

Housing

You’ll be given somewhere to live if you need it. This could be in a flat, house, hostel or bed and breakfast.

You cannot choose where you live. It’s unlikely you’ll get to live in London or south-east England.

Cash support

You’ll get £40.85 for each person in your household. This will help you pay for things you need like food, clothing and toiletries.

Your allowance will be loaded onto a debit card (ASPEN card) each week. You’ll be able to use the card to get cash from a cash machine.

Extra money for mothers and young children

You’ll get extra money to buy healthy food if you’re pregnant or a mother of a child under 3. The amount you get will depend on your situation.

Maternity payment

You can apply for a one-off £300 maternity payment if your baby is due in 8 weeks or less, or if your baby is under 6 weeks old.

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