Tax self-assessment: HMRC waives fines again for late filings

Fines will be waived for anyone who submits their self-assessment tax return up to a month after the normal deadline of 31 January.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) said fines would not be enforced for anyone who files by 28 February.

The move has been met with surprise. Typically, not meeting the deadline results in an automatic £100 penalty.

HMRC said Covid had put added pressure on individuals and tax advisers to complete online submissions.

The tax agency said 6.5 million customers had already filed their tax returns for the 2020-21 financial year, just over half of the 12.2 million required to do so.

“We know the pressures individuals and businesses are again facing this year, due to the impacts of Covid-19,” said Angela MacDonald, HMRC’s deputy chief executive.

“Our decision to waive penalties for one month for self-assessment taxpayers will give them extra time to meet their obligations without worrying about receiving a penalty.”

It is the second year in a row that such a decision has been taken on fines, owing to the pandemic.

In addition, anyone unable to pay their self-assessment tax by 31 January will not receive a late payment penalty if they pay their tax in full, or set up a time to pay arrangement (which spreads the cost over time), by 1 April.

However, interest will still accrue on any unpaid tax from 1 February.

Groups representing tax advisers and accountants welcomed the move, but said it was also designed to ease pressure on HMRC.

“It is a very surprising and unexpected move, acknowledging possible difficulties taxpayers have faced because of the recent impact of coronavirus,” said Nimesh Shah, chief executive at Blick Rothenberg.

Lucy Frazer, financial secretary to the Treasury, said: “We recognise that Omicron is putting people under pressure, so we are giving millions of people more breathing space to manage their tax affairs.”

Like this article? Share on

Facebook
Linkdin
Twitter
Telegram
WhatsApp

Related articles

Information about our own complaints process, raising concerns to the Legal Ombudsman and to us

We want to give you the best possible service. However, if at any point you become unhappy or concerned about the service we provided then you should inform us immediately, so that we can do our best to resolve the problem.

In the first instance it may be helpful to contact the person who is working on your case to discuss your concerns and we will do our best to resolve any issues at this stage. If you would like to make a formal complaint, then you can read our full complaints procedure here. Making a complaint will not affect how we handle your case.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority can help you if you are concerned about our behaviour. This could be for things like dishonesty, taking or losing your money or treating you unfairly because of your age, a disability or other characteristic. 

You can raise your concerns with the Solicitors Regulation Authority.

What do to if we cannot resolve your complaint

The Legal Ombudsman can help you if we are unable to resolve your complaint ourselves. They will look at your complaint independently and it will not affect how we handle your case.

Before accepting a complaint for investigation, the Legal Ombudsman will check that you have tried to resolve your complaint with us first. If you have, then you must take your complaint to the Legal Ombudsman:

  • Within six months of receiving our final response to your complaint; and,
  • Within one year of the date of the act or omission about which you are concerned; or
  • Within one year of you realising that there was a concern.

 

If you would like more information about the Legal Ombudsman, you can contact them at the following details:

 Contact details

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By closing this message, you consent to our cookies on this device in accordance with our cookie policy unless you have disabled them.